Manhattan Film Festival

MFF Announces Monthly Film Series

The Manhattan Film Festival will be now hosting a monthly film series. We have launched this program in conjunction with our Filmmaker Revenue Sharing Program. It is a way to provide year round programming while providing filmmakers the opportunity to raise revenue for new projects, cover submission fees, marketing, etc. Like our revenue sharing program, filmmakers will earn 50% of every ticket sold using their affiliate accounts. As part of this program we will also book cast & crew as well as press screenings. In these instances we would use an alternative to ticket sales to protect premiere status. There will be no submission fees or selection process. For more information about this program simply email us with the subject “Monthly Film...

“On The Radioman” an MFF Exclusive Interview

“Buffalo Boys” Director Debuts First Feature Film

By: Alyssa Zauderer Not everyone gets second chances in life. Sometimes even if you’ve received a second chance, the consequences will still follow. This concept is one that Ray Guarnieri kept close while directing his first feature film “Buffalo Boys.” So originally you were an actor, how did you make the transition over to director? I got into this business through acting. I graduated from the Academy of Dramatic Arts. I worked for about 2 years trying to get started as an actor. I got into acting to do theater originally. After I graduated I wasn’t getting cast in any plays. I was freelancing with an agency and I kept getting cast in indie films, short films and student films. I spent so much time on film sets with indie productions. If you have the right attitude you can learn a lot about the whole film making process and that’s what I did. I spoke with my friends Matt Tester and Mckenzie Trent who are two of the producers on Buffalo Boys. They’re also fellow actors and we would talk about not getting cast in the type of roles we would like to play…typical actors trying to make it in New York talk. So we decided we would start our own production company, buy some camera equipment and create our own roles with characters we wanted to explore. And the film was inspired by a true story? I was friends with this kid who the main character is inspired by in middle school. When we made that switch to high school we started to grow apart. It was those high school years that he started to go down the wrong path. He and this other boy get sucked into this plan to murder an old woman to collect her life insurance policy. So it’s a bit of a crime drama but it also has very strong family drama elements. Because this was someone you knew, what were you looking for when you casting Ian. What was the most important thing for you to capture this person? It’s funny; I was very stubborn during the casting process. For Ian I wanted someone that was going...

MFF Talks With “Local Commercial” Crew

By: Shannon Grant With over-the-top characters, such as a litigator who can get you money for being unfriended on Facebook, Local Commercial is a film about a local commercial shoot gone awry. The film will be screened at the Manhattan Film Festival on June 24. I spoke with actress/co-writer Didi Dobbs and Director Richard Dobbs who shed light on their original comedy. MFF: Can you explain the premise of the film? Richard: The film was inspired by our fascination with local commercials. We thought it’d be interesting to do a film about the making a local commercial through the perspective of the director. Our director is a guy who has enjoyed a long, successful career and he’s showing up to do this local commercial gig expecting it to be the easiest time of his life and it turns into his worst nightmare. Didi: It’s just one landmine after another. He finds out things are going wrong on the set and things are almost immediately out of his control. MFF: How would you describe the chemistry on set? D: There are two things. First, we knew that we had to do this really fast so the chemistry on the set was kind of professional like “lets get this done because we know we don’t have an unlimited amount of takes” But when we have John Ratzenberger and Frank Converse on a set you can’t help but have fun. R: The cast is terrific. We did help ourselves by having a table read with all the cast members so everyone got to say the words out loud to each other about a month before we shot. When shooting comedy you have to be spontaneous. That’s where Didi, Frank and John’s experience with improvisation comes in. You’ve got actors who can wing it. When their doing something that works, you leave them alone. MFF: What’s the hardest part of writing a comedy? D: The hardest part is that I’m always right. (laughs) You have to know how to have a sense of play if you’re writing a comedy. The premise of the film was so solid that it wasn’t real easy to write but it wasn’t that...